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  • Category Archives electronica
  • Twirligig – Jonti

    Listening to Jonti’s album on the way home on the train, and it’s as wonderfully quirky, rich and fun as I’d been led to believe. It honestly does feel like you’ve wondered into a warm happy place where the music charms, the vocals are soft and dreamy, and the samples and offbeat additions to the melody add to a delirious sense of joyful repose. It feels like a bright happy splash of colour – yes I know I have just felt a visual image but that is truly what it’s evoking in me – or wandering through a candy store where everything is bright and happy and delicious, and not in a way that makes you feel like you’re going to die from a sugar dose.


    What I am particularly enjoying is the sensation of easing gently into the evening, the music’s trills, bleeps and whoops not in the least unsettling but adding to the general ambience of quiet joy. That’s not to say that the album doesn’t have presence or impact. It is certainly no piece of easily discarded New Age fluff, not even close. It’s presence lies simply in it’s rich, warm, bewitchingly original tones that are a million miles from anything else I have heard in quite a while. This is no mean feat in an age where everything feels like a retread and echoes of melodies that have gone before.

    Well done Jonti. You are your own man and have made an album that is head and shoulders above so much else out there. Plus it feels like a happy sunshiny day and that makes this tired, stressed out corporate coal face worker very happy indeed.

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  • Soft Universe- Pnau (review)

    This is an enormously catchy, at times even euphoric , album.
    The biggest appeal for me is the inherent catchiness of the melodies – infectiously upbeat in Everybody & Unite Us, and achingly beautiful in Something Beautiful, which sighs on the wings of great regret and sadness. The creative impulse behind the album was apparently Nick Littlemore’s break up with his girlfriend (he is one half of the duo along with old friend, Peter Mayes) but while you’d think that means it’s mired in the doldrums, and you’ll be ready to slash wrists or leap off buildings by the end of it, it’s actually a joyous affair suffused with the giddy sense that life has got better, and will continue that upward lunge.
    It is the perfect soundtrack to going to and from work by the way since I tend to arrive feeling like the day will be wonderful, when often it is chaotically busy, crazy, mad and stressful, in common with many people who work for modern corporations, and feeling like that can only be a good thing. Listen to this album if only to remind yourself that good music can tame the nasty beast of modern reality and elevate you up above the morass.
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